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Tulbaghia violacea

   (Family: Alliaceae)
   
Afrikaans: wildeknoflok, wilde knoffel English: wild garlic  EDIT
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Plant Type: EDIT  Shrub
Height: 0.5m
Special properties:
  Drought Resistant (heavy)
  Frost Tolerant (heavy)
  Has Medicinal Uses
Rarity Status:
Common
   
Preferred rainfall: Winter
Preferred position:
Full Sun
Tolerated soil:  
  Sand (coarse texture, drains easily),
Clay (fine texture, holds a lot of water)
 
Flowering time EDIT
x x x x                
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Flower colours
 
Pink
Flower shape
Flower type
 
  Flower scent EDIT
  Garlic scented
  Polinator
  moth
  Flower info
  The pinkish mauve, tubular flowers, clustered into umbels of up to twenty flowers
 
 
Leaf shape EDIT
Leaf texture Smooth
 
  Leaf scent
  Garlic
  Leaf info EDIT
  Evergreen
 
 
 
Fruit type EDIT
 
 
Seed colour
Black
  Seed info EDIT
  The fruit, triangular capsules, are grouped into a head, and when ripe they split to release the flattened, hard black seeds.
 
 
Description EDIT
Tulbaghia violacea is a fast-growing, bulbous plant, The leaves are long, narrow, strap-like, slightly fleshy and smell strongly of garlic when bruised. They grow from fat, tuberous roots which spread to form clumps of plants.
Growing EDIT
Propagate from seed or by dividing larger clumps. The hard black seeds are best sown in spring in deep seed trays and can be planted out during their second year. Once the clumps that have been divided are planted, they should be left undisturbed for as long as possible. First flowering can generally be expected in the second or third year
Distribution EDIT
This drought resistant plant stretches from the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo, to as far north as Zimbabwe.
History EDIT
Uses EDIT
Wild garlic is traditionally used fro fever and colds, but also for asthma and tuberculosis. Decoctions are administered as enemas for stomach problems. The leaves are used to treat cancer of the oesophagus.

This attractive plant is ideal for the herb garden, as both the leaves and flowers can be used in salads and other dishes. The crushed leaves may be used to help cure sinus headaches and to discourage moles from the garden (by their strong smell). The smell repels fleas, ticks and mosquitoes when crushed on the skin.
Ecology EDIT
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