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Freylinia lanceolata

   (Family: Scrophulariaceae)
   
Afrikaans: heuningklokkiesbos English: honeybells, honeybell bush  EDIT
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Plant Type: EDIT  Tree
Height: 2.5 - 4.5m
Spread: 2.5 - 4.5m
Special properties:
  Drought Resistant (light)
  Frost Tolerant (light)
Rarity Status:
Common
   
Preferred rainfall: Winter
Preferred position:
Full Sun
Tolerated soil:  
  Loam (gritty, moist, and retains water easily),
Clay (fine texture, holds a lot of water),
Sand (coarse texture, drains easily),
Marshy (remains wet all year around)
pH: acid
 
Flowering time EDIT
        x x x x        
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Flower colours
 
Cream
 
Yellow
Flower shape
Flower type
 
  Flower scent EDIT
  Honey-fragranced
  Polinator
  Butterfies and other insects
  Flower info
  The flowers attract a variety of insects, which become food for insectivorous (insect-eating) birds such as blackheaded oriole, pied and crested barbets, Cape robin and thrushes.
 
 
Leaf shape EDIT
Leaf margin
Leaf type
Leaf arrangement
Bark / Stem type
 
  Leaf info EDIT
  Evergreen
 
 
 
Fruit type EDIT
Fruit colour
Brown
 
  Seed info EDIT
  Fruits are small brown capsules produced all year.
 
 
Description EDIT
Shrub growing as high as 4.5m and spreading to 4.5m.
Honey-fragranced flowers are borne through most of the year with the main times being winter and spring.
Growing EDIT
This plant is easily propagated from seed. The tiny, wingless seeds germinate readily within three weeks. Take stem cuttings during the warmer summer months. Under suitable conditions young plants grow fast and may flower within a couple of seasons.
Distribution EDIT
Occurs in moist areas, along streams or on the edge of marshes/'vleis'in the southwestern Cape, northwards to Calvinia and eastwards to Uitenhage.
History EDIT
Uses EDIT
Wood is not strong enough to be of use.

Wind-resistant, frost-hardy and is a great addition for indigenous or fragrant gardens.
Ecology EDIT
The flowers attract a variety of insects, which become food for insectivorous (insect-eating) birds such as blackheaded oriole, pied and crested barbets, Cape robin and thrushes.
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