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Bulbine frutescens

   (Family: Asphodelaceae)
   
Afrikaans: alsem kopieva, geelkatstert English: snake flower, cat's tail, burn jelly plant Xhosa: itswele lenyoka, utswelana Zulu: Ibhucu  EDIT
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Plant Type: EDIT  Shrub
Height: 0.2m
Special properties:
  Drought Resistant (heavy)
  Has Medicinal Uses
Rarity Status:
Common
   
Preferred rainfall: Winter
Preferred position:
Full Sun
Tolerated soil:  
  Sand (coarse texture, drains easily),
Clay (fine texture, holds a lot of water)
pH: acid
 
Flowering time EDIT
                x      
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Flower colours
 
Yellow
 
Orange
Flower shape
Flower type
 
  Polinator
  Bees
  Flower info
  The petals are either yellow or sometimes orange, which combines attractively with the fluffy yellow stamens to give a bi-coloured look
 
 
 
  Leaf info EDIT
  Evergreen
 
 
 
Fruit type EDIT
Sow seeds in Spring
 
 
Seed colour
Black
  Seed info EDIT
  seeds which are dispersed by wind
 
 
Description EDIT
Fast growing, branched, succulent perennial with fleshy, linear green leaves in opposite rows and clasping the stems at the base. It forms spreading clumps with greyish green stems often bearing adventitious roots. The small 6-petaled star shaped flowers are carried on an upright, spreading raceme during spring (or occasionally at other times). The petals are either yellow or sometimes orange, which combines attractively with the fluffy yellow stamens to give a bi-coloured look. The fruit is a small, rounded capsule and contains black seeds which are dispersed by wind
Growing EDIT
Propagation is from seed, cuttings or either division of clumps, and should be done in spring.
Distribution EDIT
Bulbine frutescens occurs widespread throughout parts of Northern Cape, Western and Eastern Cape; however, it reaches its peak in the succulent-rich, dry valleys of Eastern Cape.
History EDIT
Uses EDIT
The fresh leaf produces a jelly-like juice that is wonderful for burns, rashes, blisters, insect bites, cracked lips, acne, cold sores, mouth ulcers and areas of cracked skin. This plant is ideal to grow and is a useful first-aid remedy for childrens' daily knocks and scrapes. The Rastafarians make an infusion of a few fresh leaves in a cup of boiling water. The strained drink is taken for coughs, colds and arthritis.

A study of the in vivo and in vitro effect of Bulbine frutescens and Bulbine natalensis on cutaneous wound-healing.

The biochemical analysis of the wound tissue showed a significant increase in the collagen, protein and total DNA content of both B. frutescens and B. natalensis treated wounds when compared to the untreated wounds. There was no significant difference in the hexosamine content of the both B. frutescens and B. natalensis treated and untreated wounds. Analysis of the wound tissue displayed an increase rate of closure of the wound tissue treated with B. frutescens and B. natalensis when compared to the untreated wounds. Full re-epithelialisation of both treated wounds occurred sooner than in the untreated wounds.
Ecology EDIT
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References

 
  www.alvaroviljoen.com  
 
 

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